Behaeghe Aimé

Behaeghe Aimé
Behaeghe Aimé

Aimé Behaeghe was born in Kachtem (Izegem) on November 17th, 1890. An amateur cyclist in his spare time, young Aimé became abicycle repair man, before studying auto mechanics and aircraft construction. From 1913 to 1914, he lived in Brasil with his brother Joseph, where he became an accomplished pilot. When Germany invaded Belgium on August 4th, 1914, Aimé and his brother returned to Belgium to volunteer in the army. On October 29th, Aimé was employed in the Belgian Airforce, where he soon …

Vandelanotte Amatus

Born in Poperinge on April 6th, 1851, Amatus Vandelanotte became the parish priest of Hooglede on March 19th, 1911. In the late summer of 1915, a group of intoxicated German bakers were crossing the market place in Hooglede, when junior officer Cadts noticed a light shining from the church tower. As there was no doubt in their minds that the parish priest was working as a spy for the Allies, the group made towards the parsonage to wake the parson. Vandelanotte received death threats en was chas…

Mahieu Jan

Mahieu Jan
Mahieu Jan

Jan Mahieu-Liebaert was born in Roeselare on November 12th, 1874. He was elected mayor of the city in 1908, and held his office until 1946. During World War I, he often took a stand for his city, mediating between the city’s inhabitants and the German Ortskommandant. When most of Roeselare was evacuated in 1917, Jan Mahieu went to Brussels. He was succeeded by acting mayor Pieter Staessens. Mahieu returned to Roeselare towards the end of 1918 to take leadership of the city’s reconstruction.…

Van Wtberghe Georges

Van Wtberghe Georges
Van Wtberghe Georges

Georges Van Wtberghe was a linen manufacturer from Izegem. His mill was located between the railroad and the channel. Furthermore, he was the chairman of Izegem's musical society ‘de Grétyrkring’. During the war, he put many of his resources and possessions at the disposition of the Red Cross. He also provided beds for wounded soldiers. On August 6th, 1914, his father’s private street was claimed by the Germans and renamed “Berlinerstrasse”. It was used to accommodate a number of ten…

Cardoen Karel Lodewijk

Cardoen Karel Lodewijk
Cardoen Karel Lodewijk

On Schuwe Maandag, German soldiers gathered all inhabitants of Roeselare were on the Grand Place. A number of them escaped and hid on the Nieuwmarkt. Among them was Karel-Lodewijk Cardoen, a 60 year old widower who lived in the Karnemelkstraat. Karel-Lodewijk took refuge in the cellar of a local bar. Shots were fired, presumably by French soldiers who had stayed behind. Near the entrance to the bar, the corpse of a German soldier lay on the ground. The Germans, who were convinced that the shots…

Lybeer Achiel

Lybeer Achiel
Lybeer Achiel

Roeselare-based apothecary Achiel Lybeer was conscripted into the army during World War I. He mainly worked at the H.E.A. military hospital (Hôpital d’Evacuation en Arrière), a field hospital behind the frontline, based in Adinkerke. He was responsible for the distribution of medicines. A passionate photographer, Achiel took pictures wherever he went, even during the war. Given that his action radius was centred around Adinkerke, most of his photographs were taken near the coast and in the …

Colpaert Arthur

Izegem-born Arthur Colpaert volunteered in the Belgian Army at the start of the First World War. After a short training period, he was employed as an artillerist in section B211. Later on, he was transferred to the “genie”, a group of soldiers who were in charge of the construction of important structures, such as bridges. For 4 years, he served as a soldier in different parts of the frontzone. When he had time off, he visited his family. Arthur left a war diary, a transcript of his experie…

Brother Adolf

Brother Adolf
Brother Adolf

Born Frans Van der Scheuren, Brother Adolf was a member of the Brothers of Love, who worked at the brothers’ school in Roeselare. When the war ended, Brother Adolf applied himself to the maintenance of the military cemeteries and the identification of fallen soldiers.  On January 20th, 1919, the city council of Roeselare put Brother Adolf in charge of the fallen soldiers’ funeral arrangements. In the first six months after the armistice, he replied to thousands of letters from parents and …

Heller Carl

Heller Carl
Heller Carl

Carl Heller was a German citizen who resided in The Netherlands before the First World War broke out. In 1914, he was conscripted into the German army. Deployed on the Western Front, he fought in Marne, Argonne, Verdun and Ypres. He was severely wounded on three occasions, and received the Iron Cross. During the war, Carl Heller wrote down many of his experiences and impressions. From these documents, it transpires that Heller was, at some point, wounded and nursed in the BIE-region. …

Saelen Emiel

Saelen Emiel
Saelen Emiel

Emiel Saelen was the son of the fruiterer and fishmonger in the Statiestraat in Lichtervelde. In March of 1918, he was arrested for smuggling letters, and accused of espionage. He was imprisoned in Roeselare, where he was physically abused by his interrogators. Luckily for him, Emiel managed to escape. He had been wandering about aimlessly for days, when on March 16th, he joined up with 2 partners in misfortune and arrived at ’t Schaekske, a suburban neighbourhood in Torhout. There, the three…

Remarque Erich Maria

Remarque Erich Maria
Remarque Erich Maria

Erich Maria Remarque (22 June 1898 - 25 September 1970), was a well known German writer. He was conscripted into the German army in 1916, and sent to the front line. He served on the Western Front from 26 June until 31 July, 1917. His experiences as a soldier inspired him to write his most famous work ‘Im Westen nichts Neues’, translated into English as 'All Quiet on the Western Front’. The novel was published in 1929, and became the most popular war novel of World War I. It was translate…

Schotte Ernest

Ernest Schotte was born on June 27th, 1974. He succeeded his father as clerk to the council of Ingelmunster.  In October 1918, Ernest was wounded in the foot and found in the Weststraat, where he had been hit by a German grenade or bullet. The German Red Cross accompanying the army took him with them to administer first aid care. He was first brought to Waregem, then to Deinze, where his foot was amputated. Eventually, he was taken to Ghent, where he died on October 20th, just days before the …

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